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Click to enlarge the Robie House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture) Click to enlarge the Guggenheim (NY)

Architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright

The Master of the trade. A looser as for his personal life. Strange, since his motto (from an Emerson poem) is so very valuable:

"Whoso would be a man, must be a nonconformist.
Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind."

Click to Enlarge all the way through this page, by the way.

Pictures below are mostly my own.
Let's see - we'd best discuss his work per style (period) he went through. These being: Or go to some more text and links...



Shingle

The Home and Studio (1889-1911); a bit of a mess. Click to enlarge Home and Studio (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Parker House (Own picture) The Robert P. Parker House (1892); a typical bootleg period house.
The Thomas H. Gale House (1892); a second typical bootleg period house. Click to enlarge Thomas H. Gale House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Walter H. Gale House (Own picture) The Walter H. Gale House (1893); a third typical bootleg period house.
The Francis J. Woolley House (1893); yet another typical bootleg period house. Click to enlarge Woolley House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Chauncey Williams House (Own picture) The Chauncey I. Williams House (1895).
The Nathan G. Moore House (1895). Because he needed the money, FLlW stooped to the Tudor style. And to his horror was afterwards swamped with commissions...
Click to enlarge Nathan Moore House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Nathan Moore House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Goodrich House (Own picture) The Harry C. Goodrich House (1896); Already moving towards a bit of Chicago style.
The George W. Smith House (1895-8). Yet another classic. Click to enlarge G.W. Smith House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Unity Temple Click to enlarge Unity Temple (Own picture) Click to enlarge Unity Temple (interior) Click to enlarge Unity Temple (interior, own picture)
Unity Temple (designed 1904, opened 1908)

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Chicago school

The William H. Winslow House (1894) with the double-hung windows that FLlW so disliked ("Like guillotines") Click to enlarge Winslow House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge (Rollin) Furbeck House (Own picture) The (Rollin) Furbeck House (1897); quite elegant.
The James Charnley residence (1891); ahead of its time, still some sort of oddity in FLlW's works. Click to enlarge Charnley residence

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Prairie


Click to enlarge the Robie House (interior)
Click to enlarge the Robie House (Own picture) Click to enlarge the Robie House (Own picture) Click to enlarge the Robie House (Own picture)
The Frederick C. Robie House (1906). The classic. My pictures are better than what is generally to be had on the web. Too bad one isn't allowed to photograph the interior.

There's others, too

Click to enlarge Davenport House (Own picture) The E. Arthur Davenport House (1901). A mix of styles.
The William G. Fricke House (1901). An early one, still quite heavy on vertical elements. Click to enlarge Fricke House Click to enlarge Fricke House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Thomas House Click to enlarge Thomas House (Own picture) The Frank Wright Thomas House (1901), "The Harem". Ahead of its time, although bleak.
The Ward Willits House (1901). Very consistent. Click to enlarge Willits House
Click to enlarge Martin House Click to enlarge Martin House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Martin House (Own picture) The William E. Martin House (1902). Like a high-rise but well-balanced.
The Arthur Heurtley House (1902); impressive. Click to enlarge Heurtley House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Heurtley House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Darwin D. Martin House Click to enlarge Darwin D. Martin House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Darwin D. Martin House (garage, own picture) The Darwin D. Martin House (1902). Huge.
(With garage)
The George Barton House (1903); on the same complex as the Darwin D. Martin house; smallish but well-balanced.
Click to enlarge Barton House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Cheney House (interior, own picture) Click to enlarge Cheney House (interior, own picture) Click to enlarge Cheney House (interior, own picture) Click to enlarge Cheney House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Cheney House (interior, own picture; barrel vault!) Click to enlarge Cheney House (interior downstairs, own picture) The Edwin H. Cheney House (1903). We stayed there.
Watch the treasure of the Third Barrel Vault!!
The F.F. Tomek House (1904); Still for sale, for the bargain price of only $975.000...

Click to enlarge Tomek House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Mrs. Thomas H. Gale House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Mrs. Thomas H. Gale House (Own picture) The Mrs. Thomas H. Gale House (designed 1904, built 1909); there's more than one Thomas Gale house, you know...
The W.R. Heath House (1905), looks quite large. We hold this summary of prairie style in higher regard than usual. Click to enlarge Heath House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Susan Lawrence Dana (Thomas) House Click to enlarge Susan Lawrence Dana (Thomas) House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Susan Lawrence Dana (Thomas) House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Susan Lawrence Dana (Thomas) House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Susan Lawrence Dana (Thomas) House (Own picture) The Susan Lawrence Dana (Thomas) House (1905); the picture is too small to capture the grandeur of the house, and will be replaced by my own, later, and enhanced with interior picture of my own. Too bad no good pictures of the interior are available on the web! (The Dana-Thomas site has gone astray)

Peter A. Beachy House (1906), considered a prime example of prairie style but we find it rather disappointing. Click to enlarge Beachy House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge River Forest Tennis Club (Own picture) Click to enlarge River Forest Tennis Club (Own picture) The River Forest Tennis Club (1906). Hard to get a good picture.
Click to enlarge Hills/DeCaro House Edward R. Hills / DeCaro House (1906). Considered a prairie style house, though I tend to see quite some Chicago if not shingle style elements still.
Dr. Wm.H. Copeland House (1908-9) interior remodeling. Click to enlarge Copeland House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Isabel Roberts House (Own picture) Isabel Roberts House (1908), hugely underestimated.
Avery Coonley House (1908) and playhouse (1912). What a site. B-i-g! The first two pictures (from opposite sides) are taken some 100m. apart. Click to enlarge Avery Coonley House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Avery Coonley House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Avery Coonley House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Avery Coonley House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Coonley Playhouse (Own picture)
Meyer May House (1908). Beautiful, well-balanced, both the exterior and the interior. Often mentioned as having Roman brick, but that's false. It's normal brick, for once! Click to enlarge Meyer May House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Meyer May House (Own picture) Click to enlarge Meyer May House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Stockman House G.C. Stockman House (1908), almost identical to the Hunt house.
Alexander Davidson House (1908), in Buffalo, for a change. Click to enlarge Davidson House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Kibben Ingalls House (Own picture) J. Kibben Ingalls House (1909).
William E. Drummond House (1910), ... by William E. Drummond! (An FLlW-assistant, though) Click to enlarge Drummond House (Own picture)
Click to enlarge Balch House Click to enlarge Balch House (Own picture) Oscar B. Balch House (1911)
Harry S. Adams house (1913) Click to enlarge Adams House

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Western concrete / Textile block

The Charles Ennis House (1923); later renamed Ennis-Brown House in recognition of the extensive restoration work by the Brown family. Relatively many pics here, to instruct of the Mayan temple like impression. Click to enlarge Ennis-Brown House
Click to enlarge Ennis-Brown House Click to enlarge Ennis-Brown House
Not without luxury, though...
Click to enlarge Ennis-Brown House

Arizona Biltmore Hotel (1927) Click to enlarge Arizona Biltmore Hotel
Click to enlarge Hollyhock House
Aline Barnsdale Hollyhock House (1917), clearly a Mayan temple...

Click to enlarge Hollyhock House

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Usonian

"Usonian" since Wright had searched for a catch-phrase for real American architecture. So United States Of North (I) America-N it was to be.
For his typical style, at least. A subset of which is also called Usonian Automatic, for the style was supposed to focus on easily mass-produced houses. Not that they turned out to be too cheap, and the build and finishing qualities were very much up to standard, with perfection sought in the finish. But still, easily configured with a consistent style (if not elements, one sees these differ time and again...).
Sigh, too much text already. On to some pictures:

I.N. Hagan House (Kentuck Knob, 1954) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House, own picture) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House, own picture) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House, own picture) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House, own picture) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House, own picture) Click to enlarge Kentuck Knob (Hagan House, own picture)
Click to enlarge Affleck House (Own picture) The Gregor S. Affleck House (1940)
The Melvin Maxwell Smith House (1946). Beautiful indeed. Click to enlarge M.M. Smith House (Own picture) Click to enlarge M.M. Smith House (Own picture)
Errr, more Usonians may follow.

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Other, various style through the ages


Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. House: Fallingwater ... (1935) Click to enlarge Fallingwater Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture) Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture) Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture) Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture) Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture) Click to enlarge Fallingwater (Own picture)
Click to enlarge the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Annunciation Greek Orthodox church (1956)
Scoville Park fountain (1903) (with pa, with All-American flag) Click to enlarge Scoville Park fountain (Own picture, with pa) Click to enlarge Scoville Park fountain (Own picture, with flag)
Click to enlarge the Guggenheim (NY) Solomon R. Guggeheim museum (New York, completed 1956)
Johnson & Son Wax Co. Administration Building and Research Tower (1936-1950) Click to enlarge Johnson Wax (exterior) Click to enlarge Johnson Wax (interior)
Click to enlarge Marin County Civic Center Marin County Civic Center (1957)

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Other material, links

Click to enlarge Sullivan's first skyscraper Sullivan's first skyscraper. Showing why the master teacher couldn't keep F Ll W in.
Are these all, then? No, certainly not. Frank Lloyd Wright had hundreds of his designs built. Some have been demolished, but there are a great many that are not even mentioned or shown on this page that are by others considered at least equally important. Just as examples: Taliesin and Taliesin West and Affleck and Anderton Court Shops and Beth Sholom Synagogue and Bogk residence and Ravine Bluffs Development and Wingspread and Unitarian Meeting House and Lindholm Service station and Imperial Hotel and La Miniatura and Price Tower and First Christian Church...
But hey, it's my taste that counts here, isn't it? And I tend to think of the Taliesins as being overrated, and too much connected with the sectarian community ideas to be able to function as icons.
Hm:
Click to enlarge Beth Sholom synagogue Click to enlarge Price Tower


Therefore, if in search of other buildings, check out the links:

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Oh, and by the way, if you're planning to see the sites, why don't you give the Willow Tree Inn a try. See www.willowtreeinn.com, and
Click to enlarge the Willow Tree Inn

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